[kwlug-disc] XML / XSL / XSD/ XSLT 'development' 'environment' / 'gui'?

unsolicited unsolicited at swiz.ca
Sun Dec 8 19:19:42 EST 2013


On 13-12-08 10:48 AM, John Johnson wrote:
> While I am sure you will anyway, I would like to ask that you keep
> the list informed as to your findings, recommendations,
> non-recommendations, blind alleys, etc.
>
> As I assume many others have been doing, I have been following the
> discussion for my own purposes as my employer and partners are
> increasingly using XML.
>
> Which means that, at some point, work and support for the same will
> fall into my lap.
>
> PS: Other IDEs include: Eclipse and Aptana (no idea as to whether any
> support XML etc.)

http://abstractspoon.pbworks.com/w/page/71224042/3rd%20Party%20Tools

http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/5371/ToDoList-6-8-2-Feature-Release-An-effective-and-fl

Runs under wine.

If you can get wine going at all.

(I've reported my 64-bit Kubuntu 12.04 issues on this in the past. Seems
it was solved by uninstalling wireshark - dependency stupidities within
the i386 packages.)

- although the general GUI seems to run just fine under wine, there
is/was at least one bug in using stylesheets that I have yet to be able
to pursue. (Need to know what success looks like [under Windows] to know 
what to report back to the author as broken. At least the author is 
interested in what might be broken under wine.) There are other 
non-broken ways to run stylesheets - definitely netbeans [if it weren't 
broken] and quite probably xmlstproc, for all I know.

Bear in mind I wouldn't call this (thread) 'using xml' - the app
uses xml, and I'm looking for a GUI way to produce decent printed
output from it. It'd be different if I were producing the app myself,
and munging xml along the way.

Thanks to Kahlid, I've seen Netbeans IDE run a stylesheet / proven as a
viable non-GUI stylesheet development mechanism - if it weren't broken.
7.0.1 won't load the file (encoding issue?), and 7.4 injects a bad meta
tag, ending it in > instead of />, causing the browser to fall over 
without displaying anything.

Likeliest answer is iReports (http://sourceforge.net/projects/ireport)
or Jaspersoft Studio (http://sourceforge.net/projects/jasperstudio) -
haven't been able to make the former work yet [data source issue under
windows, netbeans plugin under Linux which I haven't mastered yet], and
the latter is too brutally slow for me on my wee little windows laptop.

At least I'm starting to run more into my lack of understanding of 'XML'
than in my lack of finding an app / environment in which to work. I
expect to be visiting w3schools a lot - http://www.w3schools.com/

Eclipse seems to be a common term so may be something for you to get 
comfortable with. More than I'm interested in pursuing, myself, at the 
moment.

Unless asked, I don't expect to continue to repeatedly bombard this
Linux list about the Windows program. I've no doubt most have had quite
enough already.


> On 2013-12-07 02:15, unsolicited wrote:
>> Thanks.
>>
>> Came across freexml the other day. "Download EditiX Free XML
>> Editor 2008, Lite Version" -
>> http://www.freexmleditorsite.com/download.html
>>
>> Scrolling don some there is a free vs non- feature comparison.
>> "XSLT Template Editor" is not part of the free.
>>
>> I'll add xml copy to the list of things to look at.
>>
>> As well as Khalid's excellent suggestion of NetBeans. Makes sense,
>> you'd think a full development environment should have what I need.
>> May be extreme overkill, but I should think peeking at NetBeans
>> could be no bad thing.
>>
>> - thank you for that Khalid ... if I'm trying to find a particular
>> tree in a forest, it's useful to have the reminder that I'm in a
>> forest.
>>
>> (Thanks to all of you, actually!)
>>
>>
>> On 13-12-06 08:19 PM, Chris Craig wrote:
>>> Are you looking for a completely open source solution? If not,
>>> EditiX Lite should do what you want:
>>> http://www.freexmleditorsite.com/
>>>
>>> Or maybe XML Copy Editor, which is open source:
>>> http://xml-copy-editor.sourceforge.net/
>>>
>>> Note I haven't used either of these, just came across them.
>>>
>>>
>>> On 6 December 2013 16:15, unsolicited <unsolicited at swiz.ca>
>>> wrote:
>>>> Remember, the xml file is being handed to me. It contains what
>>>> it contains.
>>>>
>>>> <task> stuff <task> subtask stuff <task> ad infinitum <task
>>>> lots more of these possible> </task> </task> </task> </task>
>>>>
>>>> There is css in the accompanying .xsl
>>>>
>>>> Remember - the question and goal here was a GUI for taking in
>>>> .xml, .xsd, .xsl, chewing, drawing out, modifying the .xsl,
>>>> and producing a revised xsl.
>>>>
>>>> Fully expect an equivalent, later, running of 'xsltproc my.xml
>>>> my.xsl -o my.html' type of thing.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On 13-12-06 11:11 AM, John Van Ostrand wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> I imagine XLS styles are a lot like CSS styles and if you
>>>>> learn one moving to the other is easier. I expect you'll
>>>>> need to use "selectors" to display top-level tasks and sub
>>>>> tasks differently.
>>>>>
>>>>> An alternative to XLS is to use one of the many XML
>>>>> libraries in your favourite language. Generally speaking they
>>>>> import the XML into a hierarchical structure so you can
>>>>> re-organize it programmatically without having to get into
>>>>> parsing the XML text. They can then output the result back
>>>>> into HTML for processing later.
>>>>>
>>>>> However, the easiest way might be to use command line tools
>>>>> and xpath to select the elements you want to print and use a
>>>>> stylesheet to print it.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> On Fri, Dec 6, 2013 at 10:01 AM, Khalid Baheyeldin
>>>>> <kb at 2bits.com> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> On Dec 6, 2013 12:08 AM, "unsolicited"
>>>>>> <unsolicited at swiz.ca> wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Hmmm. Interesting.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Longer tool chain, but if scriptable ...
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Schema won't be a problem, .xsd files even provided.
>>>>>>> Even if not 100% accurate, schema won't change that
>>>>>>> often. Translation could be manually maintained.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Ah ... hold on ...
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> TDL does an infinite nest of sub-tasks. It's not a
>>>>>>> straightforward record 1:1
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> -+ Task 1 --+ Sub-Task 1.1 ---+ Sub-Task 1.1.1 ---| Some
>>>>>>> other notes -+ Task 2 --+ Sub-Task 2.1 ---+ Sub-Task
>>>>>>> 2.1.1 ... ----------------------------+ ... ad
>>>>>>> inifinitum
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> In generzl, such data structure would be implemented in a
>>>>>> relational database by having a column called parent task
>>>>>> id, and then you can have it point to which task is the
>>>>>> parent of the current subtask, and you can have infinite
>>>>>> levels. A task without a parent is the top level task.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> No idea how to implement that with XML import though ...
>>>>>>
>>>>>> _______________________________________________ kwlug-disc
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>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> _______________________________________________ kwlug-disc
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>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
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