[kwlug-disc] "In the new Canada, the web browses you"

unsolicited unsolicited at swiz.ca
Fri Aug 12 18:30:27 EDT 2011


(Clipper chip, yeah, encryption - point for this thread merely being 
the ability to listen in.)

Mind you ... you're right ... with ssl (https) ... isn't listening in 
at the ISP all but pointless?

Thinking of the English riots, talk of BlackBerry sniffing whatever 
... just having a sense of the preponderance of data going somewhere, 
like a facebook site, and the ability to get to that site directly 
oneself, seems sufficient. No need to crack the data itself, just, 
where it's going. And if you see bad stuff (facebook), then you're 
listening for what's headed that way.

But with https://facebook....

Colin K wrote, On 08/12/2011 6:22 PM:
> well it seems as though major websites are starting to implement ssl on all
> of their systems.  Encrypted.google.com httpS://www.facebook.com even some
> torrent sites such as https://thepiratebay.org (or could be different but i
> know it happens) its noones business but mine and my data provider's
> business what I'm doing on the internet anyone who thinks otherwise is
> strongly invading my rights and are mistaken if they think I'll give that up
> easily.
> 
> On Fri, Aug 12, 2011 at 6:12 PM, Chris Frey <cdfrey at foursquare.net> wrote:
> 
>> You're probably thinking of the Clipper Chip, back in the 90's.
>>
>> There was a large backlash, and it didn't catch on.
>>
>> The potential upcoming legislation doesn't pertain to encryption, as
>> far as I know.  They just want to be able to eavesdrop on your plaintext
>> internet traffic without a warrant.
>>
>> How this is to be paid for, I'm not sure, but it sounds like they expect
>> ISPs to implement the data capture infrastructure.
>>
>> Maybe this will renew a general interest in cryptography. :-)
>>
>> - Chris
>>
>>
>> On Fri, Aug 12, 2011 at 06:08:36PM -0400, unsolicited wrote:
>>> This starts to feel like ... I'm groping here ...
>>>
>>> Wasn't there a U.S. encryption chip some time ago where their Feds
>>> were mandating that a master key be inserted for them?
>>>
>>> Seems to me that didn't happen, but I'm not sure of that.
>>>
>>> These articles feel like an ISP equivalent to those chips.
>>>
>>> Chris Frey wrote, On 08/12/2011 5:37 PM:
>>>> Another article on this topic, FYI:
>>>>
>>>> http://www.themarknews.com/articles/6384-stopping-state-surveillance
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On Fri, Aug 05, 2011 at 03:16:41PM -0400, Chris Frey wrote:
>>>>> An article on potential changes to ISP tracking requirements:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>> http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2011/08/05/jesse-kline-in-the-new-canada-the-web-browses-you/
>>>>> My main concern is that government may have access to this data without
>>>>> a warrant.  If the data is already public (like facebook and twitter)
>>>>> that's
>>>>> one thing, but if it is connecting private data (like home address) to
>>>>> that public data, with no warrant, that's another.
>>>>>
>>>>> I'm posting the link just to share information, not to provoke a long
>>>>> political discussion. :-)
>>>>>
>>>>> - Chris
>>>>>
>>>>>
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