[kwlug-disc] kwlug on twitter?

Bob Jonkman bjonkman at sobac.com
Tue Dec 22 20:51:04 EST 2009


Chris Frey writes:

> Perhaps this is good advice, but it is also akin to recommending that
> everyone register all forms of their domain names "just in case."
>   

One is sufficient, so that if a spoof site does show up the real site 
will already be established. Hopefully the real site has greater 
Google-juice than the spoof site (which does imply that a modicum of 
maintenance on the real site is necessary, if only to keep your cell 
number up-to-date).

By the same token, only one identity in each of the major social network 
sites is necessary.  You wouldn't register "Chris Frey", "Christopher 
Frey" and "C. Q. Frey" all on Facebook. 

But social networks are a moving target, since these sites rapidly wax 
and wane in popularity:  SixDegrees supplanted by Friendster, then 
MySpace, then Facebook, and now Twitter is the darling.  And somewhere 
in there is Bebo, Frappr, Orkut, Habbo Hotel and others.  And then 
there's the other services that make use of identities: Craigslist, 
Flickr, Del.icio.us, Reddit, Slashdot, Yahoo, Google...  Not to mention 
Wikipedia, Blogspot, Wordpress, LiveJournal.  And Gitorious, Launchpad, 
GetSatisfaction. And on, and on.


> I think it is better to include your contact info in a bundle, so that
> if people see one, they see them all.

I agree. Your own Web site, complete with vCards, hCards, XFN and FOAF, 
under your own control (ie. not Facebook, Google or any of the others), 
and provide links to the various non-authoritative sites on which you 
maintain an identity.

> I can't keep up with every new web 2.0 site out there
> that wants a login.

Oh, for universal adoption of OpenID and OAuth.


> Registering all of the following only benefits the registrars:

Take a place at the end of the line:  Lawyers, telecom providers, 
government.

--Bob.


Chris Frey wrote:
> On Tue, Dec 22, 2009 at 06:57:39PM -0500, Bob Jonkman wrote:
>   
>> I recommend to people that even if they don't intend to use these 
>> services, they should acquire their name and establish an identity 
>> anyway.  Better to have your own ID than to have someone else acquire 
>> it, and possibly use it for identity fraud purposes.  If you've already 
>> established your own ID it's more difficult for someone else to spoof 
>> you.  Witness "Fake Steve Jobs" on Twitter, and Australian censorship 
>> minister Stephen Conroy on stephenconroy.com.au
>>     
>
> Perhaps this is good advice, but it is also akin to recommending that
> everyone register all forms of their domain names "just in case."
> Registering all of the following only benefits the registrars:
>
> 	chrisfrey.com
> 	chrisfrey.net
> 	chrisfrey.org
> 	chrisfrey.ca
> 	chrisfrey.on.ca
> 	christopherfrey.com
> 	christopherfrey.net
> 	christopherfrey.org
> 	christopherfrey.ca
> 	chris..... aaaaaarghhhhhh!
>
> It quickly gets out of hand, and I haven't even completed the Domain Name
> System yet. :-)  I can't keep up with every new web 2.0 site out there
> that wants a login.
>
> There are so many Chris Frey's out there, you can never be sure it's me
> or not.  And twitter's cdfrey isn't even named "Chris." :-)  (It's not me.)
>
> I think it is better to include your contact info in a bundle, so that
> if people see one, they see them all.  Ideally, a single website
> that people can visit to see all your official contact info.  An email
> signature can point to this fairly effectively.
>
> - Chris
>
>
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